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Home » Featured, Previews

Flower Power; the PS3 makes it possible

Submitted by on Friday, 23 January 20096 Comments

flower banner 300x120 Flower Power; the PS3 makes it possibleWe already talked about Flower this week, the forthcoming casual game from thatgamecompany, when we revealed the February 12th release date.

Hopefully that gameplay video we showed made you sit back and appreciate just what the PS3 is capable of. Now, we can reveal some of the startling facts behind this much-anticipated title.

The first thing you will notice about Flower is the ease with which you control the game. In Flower you play as ‘the wind’, guiding and growing a swarm of petals by interacting with other flowers and the surrounding environment.

You control this via the SixAxis in combination with any face button of your choice; tilting, yawing and banking across the world, gathering your floral followers as you go. That’s one mark on the board for the PS3, since the SixAxis is unique to the platform.

Most impressively, the PS3′s graphical power comes into play when you realise just how many objects are being animated at the same time.

SCEA tell us that over 200,000 blades of grass are simulated and animated at the same time, creating a truly lush and realistic environment. Whilst we appreciate that a blade of grass doesn’t require a huge number of polygons, 200,000 of any object being animated simultaneously is a fairly impressive feat.

Make that two points to the PS3 for having such impressive processing and graphical power.

Flower continues to intrigue us here at PS3 Attitude as we move closer to the release date. In fact, we are told that different players can choose how they want to interact with the game, and the game will respond by changing the gameplay experience accordingly.

Players with different skill levels, or even just different moods, will be rewarded with a change in the game that reflects their ability or status. How that works in action, only time will tell.

We can also reveal that Flower will have seven levels in all and should take the average player around two to three hours to complete. The experience is supposed to last around the same time as a long movie, and thatgamecompany deliberately designed Flower so that you can play through it in a single sitting and enjoy the ‘story’ that unfolds.

Look out for our full review of Flower in February.