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Home » Featured, News

Super Street Fighter IV – Adon detailed

Submitted by on Wednesday, 16 December 2009No Comment

ADON 03 Super Street Fighter IV   Adon detailedIt’s that time of the week again. The Super Street Fighter IV blog has been updated and this time we are given an in-depth look at Adon.

Jigsaw makes his return to translate the newest dev blog due to Azrael, who has been doing the translations for the past few weeks, being preoccupied. Both of these guys deserve major props for being able to translate these blogs for everyone to enjoy. We usually give a summary of the most important parts of the translation, but this time around we’re just going to paste it in its entirety. It’s an excellent read, so we hope you enjoy.

How’s everyone doing? Tsukamoto here.
Today’s subject is the newly added character Adon, so Okada, Tamamura and I will tell you a little something or other about this character in development!

-Please tell us how you decided on adding Adon to the roster.

Okada:
When choosing which characters to add to SSF4, not only characters from the Zero games were on the list, characters from SF1 were too. Adon is a Zero character as well of course, but since he was also in SF1, he was first on our list. There was some concern that we’d have a lot of quite complicated characters this time around, like Juri and Cody, so we felt there was kind of a need for simple, easy to understand characters as well. For that reason, Adon seemed like a good choice. Also, well, I don’t know what the rest of the world thinks (laughs), but everyone on the development team seemed to think Adon’s a really cool character, so he was always popular among us.

-So it was decided early that Adon would be added?

ADON 01 Super Street Fighter IV   Adon detailed

Okada:
No, actually, it took quite some time before we made the decision. Adon just hadn’t had that great of an impact as a character. When discussing it with Mr. Ono, we always ended up somewhere between “Wouldn’t Adon be a nice addition?” and “Aren’t there better choices than Adon?”, so in the end we kind of picked Adon because he’s easy to play with, more than anything.

-In other words, Adon wasn’t picked for his popularity as much as his ease of use

Okada:
Exactly. He’s by all means a very physical martial arts type character typical for Street Fighter, but his moves aren’t very complex, and I think that makes him easy to understand and fun to play.

-How did you feel when Adon’s addition was decided?

Okada:
Well, he was a character we wanted to see in the game ourselves, so it was kind of like “Yes! He made it in!”, you know. As far as development goes, there weren’t really any big concerns either.

Tamamura:
Yeah, I too felt like “Adon, this shouldn’t be too hard”. He doesn’t require the implementation of any new systems, and his moves are pretty straightforward, so I figured we would be able to spend a lot of time on just tweaking him.

Okada:
If anything, I was worried about how he would be received by fans. He’s popular among the staff, but I wasn’t sure if he was a very memorable character to anyone else. His hairstyle sure stands out, though (laughs).

Tamamura:
He is kind of a plain character, although he does have some nice moves.

Okada:
The question of whether or not he would be well received by fans was the real bottleneck, so we deliberated on his addition until the very end. I think by adding Adon, SSF4 definitely becomes more interesting and fun. There are many good reasons for adding him, but I still wasn’t sure if he was really a character that the fans wanted to see, but despite certain worries he was included. So since getting him in the game wasn’t completely without complications, it was a huge relief to see such positive reactions to the latest trailer.

Tsukamoto:
Hey, you should wait until they actually play the game before you let out your sigh of relief!! Still, positive feedback is always nice.

-What kind of character is Adon?

Okada:
To people used to standard characters like Ryu and Ken, I guess he might seem like a character with a lot of weird attacks. For example, their anti-air moves, Shoryuken and Jaguar Kick [I presume he means Rising Jaguar -Jig's note], look pretty similar, so at first glance you might think they work in the same way, but that’s not quite the case. The Shoryuken hits against attacks coming from above, so it’s really the quintessential anti-air move. However, the Jaguar Kick can be used to apply pressure in front of you, or as a sudden rushdown move, so it’s kind of a multi-purpose attack. Conversely, as a pure anti-air it’s not quite as effective as a Shoryuken. Since the days of Street Fighter Zero his moves have had slight quirks like these, which sets him apart from other characters.

-So he’s actually a pretty unique character?

Okada:
When you mention it, I guess you could say he’s unique. But not in the sense that you need to have perfect execution skills or that you have to be an absolute expert on his moves before you can use him, but more in that he might seem completely orthodox on first glance, but in reality he’s got quite a few peculiarities.

Tamamura:
I don’t think Adon is a very difficult character to play, but because he doesn’t have a lot of moves, I think you need to have a firm grasp on how each of his attacks hits. Pretty much all of his moves have some sort of special trajectory. For example, a Hadouken always attacks straight ahead, so if your opponent is on the ground, it will inevtitably hit them at some point, regardless of timing. However, Adon’s attacks all make him leap off the ground in some fashion, so if you have no clue about how he’s going to move, or when the attack actually comes out, you won’t be able to land any hits.

-What is the SSF4 version of Adon like, compared to the Zero version?

Okada:
I think Zero’s game system was designed to accomodate casual play, so compared to that I think the current Adon is kind of stoic. In SSF4, Adon is the type of character who needs to keep in mind the characteristics of his moves, and use the right one in reaction to his opponent. Adon himself might come across as a bit of a dimwitted guy who just keeps on attacking mindlessly, going “Hyaa! Hyaa!” (laughs), but a player using Adon needs to be pretty clever. Characters who have a big arsenal of moves can often throw out something that will work, even when uncertain of what exactly the opponent will do, but not Adon.

-Speaking of arsenals, will Adon’s see any additions or reductions?

Tamamura:
This version of Adon is mainly based on his Zero 3 version, but of course in that game his arsenal would change slightly depending on what ISM you were using. We figured we would try to mix all three of his ISMs, so the mid-air Jaguar Kick he had as a normal move in X-ISM has now been added as a special move. And just like Cody before him, Adon has been given some new animations to separate his far normals from his close-range ones. So all in all, his arsenal has been expanded, but he’s still a simple character as far as amount of moves go.

ADON 02 Super Street Fighter IV   Adon detailed

Tsukamoto:
Adon is an easy character to grasp indeed. His moves look cool too, so I quite like him. Although, being a simple character, he might find himself not being able to win relatively quickly, don’t you think?

Tamamura:
Well, since he’s a simple character, I think players will figure him out rather quickly. He’s only got one command normal too, even Guile has a lot of those.

-When facing him, you can kind of know what attacks to expect from Adon based on his distance – won’t this make him a bit of a pushover?

Tsukamoto:
That’s why luring your opponent into a bad position is really important for Adon.  You have to figure out how to get your opponent within range of your attacks.

Tamamura:
He might not have a lot of moves, but they all have different trajectories and ranges depending on which button you use, and that’s something you can use to your advantage. For example you can use the light version of a move and intentionally miss to bait your opponent into throwing out an unsafe counter attack which you then punish, and things like that.

-Did you have any problems when implementing Adon?

Tamamura:
Tweaking his animations, maybe? Adon has a very energetic style, so the designers and I were a little concerned about how to cut down on his animation.

-Cut down on animation?

Tamamura:
The animations created originally looked beautiful, but if we simply put them in the game as-is his movements are going to be way too slow. So the motion designer decides what the key frames for each animation are, and we basically cut out everything else and play around with the playback speed, until we’re left with a quick, snappy animation.

Okada:
We wanted to give Adon in particular a sharp kind of movement, so there was always a struggle about how much 3D expression we could remove. Now we’re getting into a very technical discussion, but in 2D games you have traditional animation; just a series of still images that appear to be in motion. The movement that occurs between those still images is filled in by the mind’s eye of the player, and the impression is that of a fluid, cool-looking motion. Having that room for imagination on the player’s part is one thing I like about 2D. Since Adon doesn’t have a lot of effects or flashy bells and whistles, there’s just no getting away from having to make his basic movements look as cool as possible. So in Adon’s case, we were careful not to stray too far from that typical 2D style of animation.

Tsukamoto:
With a simple character like this there’s just no way to fool the players, if he’s not done properly, everyone’s going to think “this character sure looks rough”. So dealing with that was tough. Even the addition or removal of a single frame would cause heated arguments between the motion designer and planner (laughs).

-Adon’s facial expressions change quite a bit, don’t they?

Tamamura:
His expression doesn’t change terribly much while he’s in the middle of fighting, his expressions are actually more about the fine detail. Adon always keeps his mouth open, so I guess he defaults to pulling a face like that (laughs).

Tsukamoto:
Well, that’s the face that always comes to mind when you think of Adon. When you look at it, it just feels like Adon, I love it. Among the newly-added Zero characters, Adon is definitely my personal favourite.

Okada:
Yeah. And when he’s laughing, he doesn’t really laugh with his mouth, because his jaw is always dropping (laughs). He laughs with his shoulders instead. He shows his emotions by moving his shoulders, his head, and his whole body. That aspect was something the designers were particular about as well.

ADON 03 Super Street Fighter IV   Adon detailed

-What is Adon like in his current state?

Okada:
Tamamura mentioned that Adon would be a simple character to implement, giving us a lot of time to spend on tweaking, and that’s pretty much how it worked out. We’re currently taking our time with tuning the character.

Tamamura:
Yeah, we’re going over everything time and again, fine tuning for as long as we can. To be honest, I first thought that he was the strongest character in the game, but I’m a little calmer about it now. We’re not really making any fundamental changes to Adon at this point, it’s more a matter of making him fit with the balancing of all the other characters.

-How strong is Adon, as he stands right now?

Okada:
His moves are easy to perform, and he’s an easy character to play, but since he doesn’t have a lot of special moves, you’ll have to use both special and normal moves equally. That means that unless you know how to use his moves well, you won’t win. So even though he’s an easy to use character, he’s not necessarily easy to dominate with. On a scale from 1 to 10, I’d say he’s a 5.

-So you mean he’s a mid-tier character?

Okada:
Yes. He’s a strong character in the sense that he doesn’t have many matchups where you’ll feel that you’re at a distinct disadvantage, but at the same time he doesn’t really have something that puts him ahead of everyone else.

-With the newly announced characters, you could say that Guy is aimed at intermediate players, while Cody is aimed at advanced players…

Tamamura:
Well, if you compare them like that, I would say that Adon is easier to use than Guy.

Okada:
Agreed, he’s an easy to use character.

Tamamura:
Indeed. If the opponent is in the air, he can hit them with his anti-air, and he can do the so called “Shoryu FADC” combo – IE, he can Focus cancel his anti-air and connect his Ultra – so if you learn the character well, there’ll be plenty of situations where you can inflict damage on your opponent. He has a lot of different combos, and many situations where he can land them.

Okada:
Actually, he’s becoming really popular among the testers. They say he’s really fun to play. When you hear everything about how his looks being simple, his gameplay being simple, and him just being pretty average across the board, you might get the impression that he’s not very interesting, but it also means that he’s very straightforward. He’s the type of character where it’s easy to come up with ideas like “If I go ahead like this, that’s going to happen” or “From this situation, I should do that move”, and just implement them right away, and that makes him very fun to play. So because of that, I think Adon is a character that everyone from beginners to pros can have fun with.

-OK, so as usual, a message for people looking forward to using Adon, please

Okada:
Looks can be deceiving, on the inside he’s actually really nice (laughs).

Tamamura:
He does equally well against pretty much everyone, so please try him out.

Okada:
Well, you can’t say whether or not you like him until you’ve tried using him, so at least don’t knock it ’till you’ve tried it. Please give Adon a try and I think you’ll like him.

Tamamura:
Kinda like cuttlefish, if you like him I think you’ll be able to enjoy him for a long time.

Tsukamoto:
Absolutely. I really hope you’ll at least try him.

Well, everyone, what did you think? We didn’t get to touch upon Adon’s all-important voice, but I think there’s potential for an interesting discussion about his and other characters voices, so I think we’ll explore that in more depth in a future installment about the sound in the game.

So this concludes our behind-the-scenes looks at all the added characters announced so far! All these additional characters sure cause a headache for the Scenario department. Speaking of which, next time I thought we’d discuss the scenario of SF4 and SSF4.

That’s it for now – see you next week, everyone!

Definitely an interesting blog. It’s a shame that more developers don’t do blogs similar to this as we’re sure that many fans would love to read them. Once again, great work Jigsaw!

[Capcom Unity] [Jigsaw]