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Home » Featured, News

UK study shows brain training games don’t improve intelligence

Submitted by on Wednesday, 21 April 20102 Comments

brain training games  e1271850666792 UK study shows brain training games dont improve intelligenceTo be honest, for many of us gamers the headline won’t be very surprising.  Brain training games have been big business over the last couple of years, with Nintendo’s platforms in particular being flooded with them.

Well we hope everyone kept their receipts – because the claim that you can “train your brain in minutes a day” seems to be a false one.

The BBC has conducted a study of 11,000 people aged up to 60 years old.  These participants were given a brain training game and told to play it for at least ten minutes a day, three times a week.

The findings have shown that those who played the brain training game performed no better on a range of tests than those who spent their time just surfing the internet.

This means that right now you are level pegging with all the brain trainers, simply by reading this article – Good job people!

Dr. Adrian Owen, assistant director of Medical Research Council’s Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge had the following to say;

“The brain trainers got better at the things that they were doing, but the holy grail of brain training is that it has some genuine effect on mental ability or intelligence and that we showed was that was categorically not the case.”

Of course, Nintendo has commented on this and said the following;

“Nintendo does not make any claims that Brain Training or More Brain Training are scientifically proven to improve cognitive function.”

Does anyone have a brain training game?  If so does your experience match the results of this study?